Reviews, profiles and news about art in Chicago

News: Venerable Roy Boyd Gallery Closes After Forty-two Years

News etc., River North No Comments »
A lively social gathering for one of Marco Casentini's exhibitions at Roy Boyd Gallery

A lively social gathering for one of Marco Casentini’s exhibitions at Roy Boyd Gallery

Roy Boyd Gallery will close its doors after forty-two years on October 15. This venerable exhibition space in River North has shown Chicago artists along with a number of artists from the West Coast and around the world. Along with several decades of exhibiting artists in his Chicago gallery, Boyd also ran a second space in Los Angeles from 1981 until 1993. In these last days of the River North location at 739 North Wells, the gallery is presenting a panoply of art objects from its remaining inventory, a salon of works comprised of touchstones from across the space’s lifetime, in particular the Boyds’ devotion to abstraction. Read the rest of this entry »

News: Major expansions for Kavi Gupta and Shane Campbell galleries

News etc., South Loop, West Loop No Comments »
Kavi Gupta Gallery's new production studio in Little Village

Kavi Gupta Gallery’s new production studio in Little Village

Two of Chicago’s most prominent galleries—Kavi Gupta and Shane Campbell—are expanding into larger spaces. Kavi Gupta has added an additional building to their Chicago properties, situated in the Little Village neighborhood. Shane Campbell Gallery will be relocating to the South Loop next spring. Read the rest of this entry »

Portrait of the Artist: Matthew Haussler

Drawings, Loop No Comments »
Matthew Haussler at work on his attempt to break the world record for longest hand drawn maze

Matthew Haussler at work on his attempt to break the world record for longest hand-drawn maze

“I brought my daughter to this room once and she spent five minutes looking at the ceiling, walking around,” says Matthew Haussler about the Cultural Center lobby. “Those are the things most adults don’t notice.” Haussler brought me here to admire the patterned coffers, not unlike the lines within his own work. Months ago he wouldn’t have believed mazes could provide a source of income, let alone that he would gun for the record of the longest hand-drawn maze. With two books of mazes just published by MindWare, and another collection of Chicago mazes funded on Kickstarter, the Cincinnati native has been busy developing his craft. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Jackie Tileston/Zg Gallery

Painting, River North No Comments »
Jackie Tileston."Recollection Station," mixed media on linen

Jackie Tileston.”Recollection Station,” mixed media on linen

RECOMMENDED

Jackie Tileston’s new paintings in “Field Guide to Elsewhere” look as if they are running along the walls of Zg Gallery. Canvas to canvas, she achieves motion with her use and command of several types of media including enamel, oil, Conté crayons, spray paint and dry pigment. In addition to the colorful, pyrotechnic landscapes that result from these materials and her studied use of them, the negative space further contributes to their kinetic feel. The landscapes are expanding and changing and these blank areas of the canvas, left only with residual washes of paint, furthers a sense of speedy movement and flight from a point of origin. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Helen Maurene Cooper/Bert Green Fine Art

Loop, Photography No Comments »
Helen Maurene Cooper. "Untitled #2," 2014, archival pigment print

Helen Maurene Cooper. “Untitled #2,” 2014, archival pigment print

RECOMMENDED

Having gained attention for her lush and exquisitely beautiful color studies of nail art, which both document the extravagant and elegant ways in which some people adorn their nails, and place those works of body art against luscious soft and liquid backgrounds, Helen Maurene Cooper now shows herself to be a versatile photographer who is at home in several diverse genres in her exhibition “Raiment in Horto.” Along with two of the nail shots, Cooper’s early survey of her artistic output offers formal color portraits of pit-bull dogs (they are quite cute), diptychs pairing murky miniature tintype portraits of drag queens (who have pulled off looking like young women) and still lifes of rough flowers in vases, and dynamic black-and-white street photos of sidewalk performances. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Kim Piotrowski/Linda Warren Projects

Painting, West Loop No Comments »
Kim Piotrowski. "Tide Tango, 2014, ink and flashe on gallery wall

Kim Piotrowski. “Tide Tango, 2014, ink and flashe on gallery wall

RECOMMENDED

The sheer intensity and level of attack sustained in painter Kim Piotrowski’s first solo show with Linda Warren Projects remained palpable days after I viewed it. In art, first impressions aren’t always reliable, and exhibitions that linger on in the back of your mind usually signal something deeper. Maybe what you initially thought was good really wasn’t, and what looked like failure was actually success in disguise.

Packed with evocative titles and equally suggestive shapes, the show’s twenty-plus works heave and ripple, yielding a sensory overload of glistening bodies enmeshed in an orgy of pleasure. Piotrowski’s slick black line is almost always upfront, potent and seductive, whipping the eye through multi-hued compositions while exposing fragmentary glimpses of any number of vaguely recognizable objects. In the wrong hands, this is the stuff of clichéd, rapidly deployed, easy-bake abstraction. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Daniel Giles and Eliza Myrie/Roots & Culture

Ceramics, Drawings, Installation, Performance, Video, Wicker Park/Bucktown No Comments »
Eliza Myrie. "diamond, diamond, graphite," graphite and paper, dimensions variable

Eliza Myrie. “diamond, diamond, graphite,” graphite and paper, dimensions variable

RECOMMENDED

In “go/figure,” Eliza Myrie and Daniel Giles converse over problems with abstraction, distortion and obfuscation of black bodies’ representations. Their respective historical research and process-based practices make manifest obscured features in histories of African mining and the craft objects of black slaves in the American South. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Magalie Guérin/Corbett vs. Dempsey

Painting, Wicker Park/Bucktown No Comments »
Magalie Guérin. "Untitled (hat-profile), 2013-14, oil on canvas

Magalie Guérin. “Untitled (hat-profile),” 2013-14, oil on canvas

RECOMMENDED

Modest in size but not shy at all, five colorful oil paintings by Magalie Guérin dance with each other across Corbett vs. Dempsey’s west wing. The dance is a type of choreographed freestyle—alive, morphing and flirtatious, the canvases beckon toward viewers to come closer. Through the physicality of the paintings’ surfaces, one can easily trace the artist’s mark and extensive process of rework. Colorful shapes float, overlap and morph together at the mercy of the artist and the observation of the audience. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Nayland Blake and Claire Pentecost/Iceberg Projects

Installation, Photography, Rogers Park, Sculpture No Comments »
Installation view of Nayland Blake and Claire Pentecost's "Polypersephony" at Iceberg Projects

Installation view of Nayland Blake and Claire Pentecost’s “Polypersephony” at Iceberg Projects

RECOMMENDED

A libidinous wit roils on the surface of “Polypersephony,” a collaborative installation by Nayland Blake and Claire Pentecost at Iceberg Projects. The title is a portmanteau combining the musical term “polyphony” (voice versus voice) with “Persephone,” the famous underworld abductee of myth.

The dimly lit space has an underworld feel, not of a cave but of the secret back room of a subterranean nightclub. Light strobes through a doorway hung with a curtain of tinsel, behind which transpires a bacchanalian gathering of garden gnomes. The tinsel allows perspective but not access, ensuring that viewers participate only in the (important) role of voyeur. The wall that encloses the space is violated by an intrusion and a protrusion. What appear at first as chthonic, genital proxies reveal themselves to be the molds from which the gnomes were cast. Read the rest of this entry »

Review: Burn It Down/Heaven Gallery

Installation, Painting, Sculpture, Wicker Park/Bucktown No Comments »
Larry Lee's installation in Heaven Gallery's "Burn It Down"

Larry Lee. “Monument for Saul Alinsky as ribbed condominium,” 2014, polystyrene, enamel, acetate and Sharpie

RECOMMENDED

Why do so many of our riots end in flames? Why do we feel drawn to sit around a campfire? We burn, in part, because fire is what birthed civilization. Fire, like man, can destroy what is old, be the life-giver to something new, or consume us all. Curator of “Burn It Down” Paul Hopkin explores fire’s dualities, and our complex relationship to it.

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